One of the best ways that busy leaders can grow leaders is to get buy-in from all levels of the nonprofit organization. From the board of directors down to the administrative support staff, everyone needs to believe in the importance of developing leaders. In addition to support from people, there needs to be support from the systems and culture of the organization. Here is a brief outline of the people and culture that you need support from in order to develop potential leaders in churches and nonprofit organizations. 

How To Grow Leaders with Support from People and Culture

Photo Credit: Pearl

I. BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND ELDERS TO GROW LEADERS

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Nonprofit organizations are often understaffed and underfunded, resulting in over worked mid-level managers. As a result, most nonprofit managers are faced with the challenge of running a program, managing a staff, providing monthly board reports, helping with various fundraising responsibilities, and last but not least, developing leaders within their staff. Sadly, all of the challenges nonprofit leaders face often prevent leadership development from occurring. While developing leaders can yield the highest outcomes for employee productivity and improvement in the community, this area often gets put aside amongst other pressures because it does not provide immediate results or feedback. 

Why Leadership Development Is Needed for Young People

Photo Credit: Ken Lund

I. MY EXPERIENCE NEEDING LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

I experienced this lack of leadership development during the six years I was an employee at the United Way. As a Campaign Associate my primary responsibility was to recruit, equip, train, and lead approximately 125 volunteers. During those five years I had three different direct supervisors. These individuals were responsible for my growth as a competent employee and potential future leader within our organization.  Continue Reading…

One of the most helpful tools I learned while attending Dallas Theological Seminary was how to create a Synoptic Study Chart. Some people call what I will describe in this post as a “Bible Chart” or “Synthetic Chart.” The name is not important. What is important is how powerful this tool can be for someone who will be teaching through a book of the Bible.

I. WHY I CREATE A SYNOPTIC STUDY CHART

Creating a chart of a book of the Bible is useful for several reasons.

One, it causes the Bible teacher to thoroughly know the message of the author. If someone begins to study a book of the Bible and maybe does not know the entire book well or does not have a thorough understanding of the book, then it is easy to teach a passage incorrectly.

Two, it helps a Bible navigate difficult passages in a book. When a Bible teacher knows a book and its entire message very well, he is going to know how to navigate difficulty passages in the book in light of the entire message of the book. Instead of him bringing his own preconceived ideas and questions to the text, he will instead think through the passage in the same way that the author had (because he knows the message of the author in other parts of the book).

Three, it is a helpful tool to introduce a book and summarize a book. When I teach Sunday School I always spend the first week of a study going over my synoptic study chart. A synoptic study chart provides a brief overview of the entire book of the Bible and it helps orient students about what will be studied. Additionally, a synoptic study also helps to show students a great summary of a book after they have studied. For me in my Sunday School class, after we have studied an entire book verse-by-verse I like to show the chart again to see if the class agrees with what I have summarized about the book. Continue Reading…

One of the most powerful tools I have learned to help me study the Bible is creating a synoptic chart or what is often called a synthetic chart. Before I teach through any book of the Bible I spend a couple of weeks creating a synoptic study chart.

During the past six months I have been teaching through the book of Philippians and this chart below is the synoptic study chart that I have been using to teach through the book.

 Synoptic Study Chart of Philippians

(Here is a PDF version, A Synoptic Study Chart of Philippians)

I. MESSAGE OF PHILIPPIANS

Believers ought to live righteously based on the example of Christ, by staying in harmony with each other, enduring suffering, and focusing on the righteousness we all have.

II. KEY VERSE Continue Reading…

In today’s post from Phil 4:18-23, Paul talks about sweet smelling sacrifices and how believers have security in their salvation. This will be one of my final (of many) posts based on the text of Philippians. 

Sweet Smelling Sacrifices and Security of the Saints Phil 4:18 -23Photo Credit: Treasures of the Bible

I. INTRODUCTION TO PHIL 4:18-23

A. Summary of the Book of Philippians

Message – Believers ought to live righteously based on the example of Christ, by staying in harmony with each other, enduring suffering, and focusing on the righteousness we all have.

Themes – The Work and Result of Christ, Sanctification, Paul’s Imprisonment, Suffering Because of Ministry

Outline – Greetings, Life Purpose, and the Goal for Believers (1); The Christian Life You Should Have (2); Paul and the Future Goal for Christians (3); Putting the Christian Life Together (4).

Past Lessons

B. Philippians 4:18-23

18And I am paid in full and have plenty. I am well supplied since I have received the things from you. Things which are a fragrant aroma and acceptable sacrifice which are well pleasing to God. 19And my God will fulfill all of your needs according to his glory in Christ Jesus. 20Now to our God and Father be the glory for evermore. 21Greet every holy saint in Christ Jesus. Everyone else with me greets you. 22All of the saints are greeting you, but most of all the believers from Caesar’s house. 23May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.

C. Introduction and Joke

A devout Quaker man was leaning on his fence watching a new neighbor move in next door. After lots of modern appliances, electronic gadgets, plush furniture, and costly wall hangings had been carried in, the Quaker called over, “If you find you’re lacking anything, neighbor, let me know and I’ll show you how to live without it.”

II. PAUL’S NEEDS (4:18-19)

18And I am paid in full and have plenty. I am well supplied since I have received the things from you. Things which are a fragrant aroma and acceptable sacrifice which are well pleasing to God. 19And my God will fulfill all of your needs according to his glory in Christ Jesus.

A. Sweet Smelling Gifts (v. 18) Continue Reading…