Judgement in the book of Revelation primarily occurs through the seven seals, seven trumpets, and seven bowls. Furthermore, that judgement, which is described as true and just (19:2) is directed toward unbelievers, believers, Satan, and demons. Up until this time the world has been under the dominion of Satan (Job 1:6-8; 2:1-2; Matt 4:8-9; Luke 10:18; 22:3; John 12:31; 1 Cor 11:14; 2 Cor 4:4; 1 John 5:19; 1 Peter 5:8). The judgment begins in the book of Revelation with 6:1-2 in the breaking of the first seal of the scroll.

Judgement in the Book of Revelation

I. THE MANNER AND METHOD OF THE JUDGMENT Continue Reading…

When examining the book of Revelation it is important to look at different themes that are emphasized throughout the book. In addition to the themes of God and satanology, the ministry of angels–angelology–is an important theme in the book of Revelation.

Angelology in the Book of Revelation

I. ANGELS REVEAL THE VISION TO JOHN Continue Reading…

The role of Satan and his demons is very prominent in the book of Revelation. In today’s post I look the theme of satanology in the book of Revelation.

Satanology in the Book of Revelation

I. TORTURE OF BELIEVERS AND UNBELIEVERS Continue Reading…

The book of Revelation provides a clear collection of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit together (1:4). While people who study the topic of “Trinitarianism” often look at Old Testament inferences of the Triune Godhead, descriptions in the Gospel of John, and Paul’s theology, the book of Revelation is often forgotten about in regards to the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit all working and existing together as one person.
God in the Book of Revelation

Today’s post examines the theme of God in book of Revelation.

I. FATHER

A. God Gave this Revelation to Jesus Continue Reading…

Two dates for the book of Revelation have been suggested. The strongest evidence supports the AD 95 date under the reign of Domitian (this is often held by the “futurist” view). However, the last one hundred years have seen a surge of support for the AD 65 date under the reign of Nero (this is the “preterist” or “partial preterist” view).

The Date of the Book of Revelation

I. 95 AD DURING THE REIGN OF DOMITIAN

A. Internal Evidence

There are five widely accepted late-date arguments that support John writing the book of Revelation in AD 95 while exiled to the island of Patmos by Emperor Domitian. Here are five arguments and a brief explanation of each.

1. Banishment of John to Patmos Continue Reading…

When interpreting the book of Revelation there are two important elements to remember.

  • First, Revelation is a fulfillment of the sixty-five books that came before it. There are hundreds of quotes, references, and allusions to both the Old and New Testaments in the book of Revelation. This means the reader needs to discern if Revelation is purposefully referencing a previous idea, quote, allusion, or does there just happen to be a commonality between what John writes and the previous writings in the Bible?
  • Second, an interpreting angel is sent from Jesus to help John understand what he is seeing. Examples of this interpreting angel or angels are seen in Rev 5:2, 4-6; 10:7-11; 14:13; 17:1-3, 15-18; 19:9-10; 21:9-10, 15; 22:6, 8-11. Because of this, when reading Revelation students need to constantly seek to understand what is said based on previous revelation in the Bible as well as the interpretations from the angel with John.

4 Methods of Interpretation for the Book of Revelation

“About twenty-five years ago upwards of five hundred works attempting to interpret the book of Revelation were on file in the British Museum. One man examined them all and testified that no two of them exactly agreed. These books, however, did fall into two general classes: (1) Those treating chapters 4–20 as history, and (2) those treating this portion as prophecy. Since then very many notable works on Revelation have been written and with a noticeable increase of certainty as to interpretation (note Dan. 12:9). The later expositions, almost exclusively, treat chapters 4–20 as prophecy” (Lewis Sperry Chafer, Must We Dismiss the Millennium? [Florida: Biblical Testimony League, 1921], 1).

I. HISTORICIST – A ROADMAP OF HISTORY Continue Reading…

As I introduce the book of Revelation I want to explain the type of literature and genre it is. In other words, I want to explain and define the textual design for the book of Revelation which is an “apocalypse.”

The Textual Design of the Book of Revelation

Photo Credit: “St. John the Evangelist on Patmos” by Jacopo Vignali

I. IMPORTANT DEFINITIONS Continue Reading…

This post starts a series through the book of Revelation. Before starting in Revelation 1 I want to give plenty of explanations for the authorship, textual design, interpretation, date, themes, and outlines for the book of Revelation. Today’s post looks at the evidence for and against John being the author of the book of Revelation.

The Author of the Book of Revelation

The author of the book of Revelation is the disciple of Jesus: John the apostle (1:1, 4, 9; 22:8). A brief survey of support for John’s authorship of this letter as well as counter arguments follow.

I. EVIDENCE JOHN WROTE REVELATION 
Continue Reading…