Today’s post concludes my biblical study on women and leadership. This has been one of the most difficult topics I have written on. Last week I wrote about Jesus’ relationship to women and women’s roles in the book of Acts. And the week before that I wrote about the Old Testament perspective on women and leadership.

Today’s post examines the most difficult of the three areas: Paul’s teaching on women and biblical leadership. A 2,000 word blog post can barely scratch the surface of this topic, but in this post I hope to provide you with a brief outline of all the important texts as well as some brief notes about hermeneutics and exegesis.

What Exactly Did Paul Say about Women and Leadership?Rembrandt’s Apostle Paul

I.     PAUL’S TEACHING ON WOMEN IN 1 CORINTHIANS Continue Reading…

Continuing my biblical study of women and leadership I am examining Jesus’ relationships with women as well as women’s roles in the Book of Acts. Some of the observations might surprise you.

Jesus' Relation to Women and Their Roles in the Book of Acts

Photo Credit: Engraving by Annibale Carracci,1597 

I.  5 OBSERVATIONS OF JESUS’ RELATIONSHIPS WITH WOMEN

A.    Women Knew the Scriptures about the Messiah and They Knew Jesus Was Him Continue Reading…

Women and their role as leaders within the church has always been a controversial topic. Some Christians land on the side of conservatism and place strong limitations on women’s roles as leaders while other Christians provide women the freedom to lead, teach, and take charge.

The Surprising and Often Forgotten Women Leaders in the Old Testament

Abigail appealing to David in 1 Samuel 25

Today’s post is the beginning of a series of blog posts looking at the topic of women and biblical leadership. This post examines some of my views on women’s roles as leaders in the contemporary church as well as a brief look at women in the Old Testament. 

I.    MY PERSPECTIVE OF WOMEN IN BIBLICAL LEADERSHIP Continue Reading…

The study of the end times is something that many people agree will happen. However, many people disagree about the manner in which the end times will occur. This blog post presents a biblical outline of eschatology (the study of “last things”). This outline is derived from the notes of Dr. Lanier Burns who teaches Systematic Theology at Dallas Theological Seminary. 

An Outline of Biblical Eschatology

I.     ESCHATOLOGY IS ABOUT HOPE

A.    First and foremost, Eschatology is about hope. 

B.    Biblical Evidence of Hope Continue Reading…

In my time studying the Bible some of the things I have learned is the Bible has been “transferred” and copied from its originals documents thousands of years ago. I have sometimes heard people make the following statements about the Bible:

The Bible is nothing but fiction!

The Bible is full of errors!

There’s no way that what we have in the Bible matches the original.

In my studies over the last couple of years I have been grateful to read and learn more about the field of study called, “textual criticism.”

Textual Criticism is a discipline that focuses on discovering what the original writings said. When describing New Testament textual criticism Daniel Wallace writes, “textual criticism is the study of the copies of any written document whose autograph (the original) is unknown or nonexistent, for the primary purpose of determining the exact wording of the original” (Interpreting the New Testament Text, edited by Darrell Bock and Buist Fanning, p. 33).

With this statement and definition of textual criticism it is important to note that there are different manuscripts of the Bible that contain different readings. Meaning, there are different wordings, different arrangements, and differences among the different biblical manuscripts that have survived over the years. However, among these differences very very few are significant differences. For example, most differences in the New Testament are different spellings of words (for example, John can be spelled Ιωαννης  or  Ιωανης), contractions and abbreviations, the and word order changing (Greek does not depend on the word order in sentences like English does). For some commentary on Old Testament textual criticism go here

As an example of just one of the differences of the supposed “changes” in the New Testament is in Ephesians 2:8. Below I will examine the different pieces of evidence to determine which reading is authentic and what the significance might be for each.

Textual Criticism and its Significance to the New Testament

Ephesians 2:8 Textual Criticism Problem
δια πισεως (text) vs. δια της πισεως (variant)

I.    EXTERNAL EVIDENCE

Continue Reading…

I regularly hear from blog readers that my posts about Bible charts are very helpful for people attempting to study and understand the Bible.

On this blog I have shared charts and studies on the books of:

Even though some of my methods of creating Bible charts have slightly changed since I wrote those posts (the main change is that I try to keep everything on one page), I still find it helpful for me to create a chart of a Bible book when I study it.

In today’s post I share a chart for the book of Acts (below), but first I would like to point you to some great blog posts I found around the web about leadership and the book of Acts. Here’s a brief compilation: Continue Reading…

One of the big debates circulating right now in Christian theology is Paul and his application of God’s promises of the Old Testament. Specifically, much of this discussion is focused on how Paul applies the promises given to the Israelites in the Old Testament to the Gentiles in the New Testament. Within this discussion includes what is meant by “seed” originally promised to Abraham all the way back in Genesis 12:2.

How Paul Applies the Promises Given to Israel to the Gentiles

Photo Credit: honorbound

Below I have attempted to outline this debate starting first with the position of Elliott Johnson, Th.D., professor of Bible Exposition at Dallas Theological Seminary. Dr. Johnson is a “classical dispensationalist” which means that he sees a distinction between the promises originally given to the Israelites and the promises given to the Gentiles in the New Testament. The second presentation of this topic will be N.T. Wright’s work. N.T. Wright is research professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at St. Mary’s College in Scotland. He is a strong advocate of the “New Perspective on Paul” movement which sees all of the promises of God being fulfilled in the New Testament church. Finally, in section III. you will find a brief exposition of this topic from myself primarily based on the third chapter of Galatians. 

I. Elliott Johnson’s Position on How Paul Applies the
Promises Given to Israel to the Gentiles

Continue Reading…

When leading volunteers in nonprofit organizations it is important that you provide evaluation and coaching to those volunteers. This is especially true if you have good volunteers that you want to keep for a long time.  

4 Essentials for Great Evaluation and Coaching of Volunteers

It’s critical that you provide regular and frequent feedback. Your volunteers need encouragement, thank you’s, and even a little constructive criticism at times.
MacKee, The New Breed, p. 94

In today’s post I show you how you can evaluate and coach your volunteers as a way to keep your volunteers long term. 

I. YOU PROVIDE

When conducting evaluations and coaching with volunteers there are several things you will need to provide in the meeting. Continue Reading…

This blog post is a book review of Three Views on the Millennium and Beyond edited by Stanley Gundry (series editor) and Darrell Bock (general editor), Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1999. 330pp. In Three Views on the Millennium and Beyond three writers present their views of the millennium. The premillennial view is presented by Craig Blaising, professor of theology at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. The postmillennial view is presented by Kenneth Gentry Jr., executive director of GoodBirth Ministries. 

Three Views on the Millennium

The amillennial view is presented by Robert Strimple, professor of systematic theology at Westminister Seminary California. Each of these writers summarizes his position on the doctrine of the millennium using a hemeneutical framework and specific biblical texts to support his view. 1

I. PREMILLENNIALISM

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Notes:

  1. Throughout this article I will share that “the premillennial view believes” or “the amillennial position thinks” as a way to articulate the position of each viewpoint. However, I realize that within premillennialism, postmillennialism, and amillennialism there are various differences even within each view. Therefore, I will present each view as if that is “the” view for that entire system of thought while also acknowledging that there is a uniqueness within each of these views.

When working with volunteers it is easy to push them to get the work done, be productive, and complete tasks. However, sometimes volunteers can feel burnt out, tired, and be in need of a break.

How to Ensure Volunteers' Self-Care

Photo Credit: New York National Guard

If you lead volunteers and want to ensure that they volunteer with you long-term it is important to ensure the care of your volunteers. In today’s post I share with you three areas in which to care for your volunteers.

Many faithful servants get sidelined by a simple problem: too much serving. You heard it here, friends—too much serving. Many new, highly motivated believers doubt that too much service is possible.
Bill Hybels, The Volunteer Revolution, p. 129

I. PAID EXPENSES

Continue Reading…