Creating Personal Spiritual Momentum

July 5, 2012 — Leave a comment

Today I am continuing my series of posts sharing what I learned about momentum from the Catalyst One-Day event taught by Craig Groeschel and Andy Stanley.

Creating Personal Spiritual Momentum
Craig Groeschel

Unhealthy spiritual dynamics kill momentum: This is true. Unhealthy people do not like to work in an unhealthy culture while unhealthy people love to work in an unhealthy culture. As leaders it is our responsibility to create healthy cultures where healthy people enjoy working in.

Craig made two statements I found very beneficial which need little commentary:

  • Say, “I will do today what I can do today, to enable me to do tomorrow what I cannot do today.”
  • So many people lose the battle long-term because they don’t look at what they can do today.

4 Things to Build Spiritual Momentum in Your Life to Sustain You

1. Do something to defeat your dark side.

Craig referenced this as a weakness or dark part of you that you struggle with. Some type of sin that you are always trying to keep at bay and minimize as much as possible. For me, my dark side is searching for significance in the work I do. Often I start to do things and want to excel at things because I want to feel significant and important. That is my dark side because I should be doing the work I do for the purpose of serving and helping others, not trying to fill my own ego. Craig says we should do something to defeat it. So, for me I often ask myself, “Why am I doing this?” or “What are my true motives?” And, when I can I do things anonymously it defeats that part of me which wants to feel important and significant.

2. Create Artificial Ministry Deadlines.

Craig shared that often when we work so hard (even too hard) for too long there is a diminishing return on our work. Meaning that when we work so much sometimes the work we produce is not worth the extra effort. In response to that he says we should set artificial deadlines that help keep us from working too long and too hard. Such as stating when we will be done with work for the day, how many hours we will allow ourselves to spend on a project, etc.

3. Delegate What Someone Else Can Do.

This seems obvious and simple but it is something we as leaders must be reminded of every single day. Craig is a strong advocate of not delegating responsibilities, but instead delegating authority. He says you will not retain great leaders if you only given them responsibility. An example of this is when leading A Day of Hope I often gave people freedom and permission to lead and create. When creating flyers a gal who helped always had freedom to create a few different flyers for us to choose from. Often I would give her some specific text to have on the flyer, but how she designed it and what it looked like was up to her. I delegated her both the responsibility of creating the flyer while also giving her the authority to make the flyer look how she wanted. When delegating our work we need to try and delegate authority, not responsibility.

4. Do Something Only You Can Do.

I have talked about this several times before here on the blog and emphasis on this point is important because it is vital to success as a leader. Read past blog posts about doing what only you can do here and here. For the purpose of Craig’s point about doing something only you can do he gave two areas that we as leaders can only do what we can do. The first was that we are the only ones who can take time off. As a leader we need to take that time off because everything else that goes on at the organization can continue temporarily without us, but the only person who can take time off for ourselves is ourself. The second is that we are the only ones who can be a husband to our wife (or a wife to our husband) and a father or mother to our kids. There is no one else who can take that place for us to substitute our role. Which is why we need to do only what we can do.

Question: What other principles do you believe we as leaders can practice to create personal spiritual momentum?

Christopher L. Scott

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Christopher Scott is Small Groups Pastor at Rocky Hilly Community Church in Exeter, CA. He has more than ten years of experience leading volunteers, running nonprofit programs, and teaching the Bible in small group settings. He holds a bachelor's degree from Fresno Pacific University and master's degree from Dallas Theological Seminary.

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